Kazuo Ohno' anniversary Butoh Class

Butoh Class with New York Butoh Institute

Kazuo Ohno' anniversary Butoh Class
Sunday, June 5, 2016
6-8pm
at CAMEO STUDIOS
STUDIO A
307 West 43rd Street corner of 8th avenue NY NY
Subways: A to Port Authority 42nd Street
Hosted by Vangeline Theater / vangelinetheater@yahoo.com

Taught by NY Butoh Institute teacher Margherita Tisato

For this class we will celebrate Kazuo Ohno'slegacy

$20 suggested donation

REGISTER HERE:

PAY HERE VIA PAYPAL or PAY HERE WITH DEBIT/CREDIT CARD

MARGHERITA TISATO has been a Principal Dancer with Vangeline Theater since 2008. She started studying dance in Italy at the age of 8. She delved into Humprey-Limon and classical techniques paired with a deep work rooted in Maria Fux's dance-therapy studies and the Tibetan theory of the 5 elements/seasons. Margherita taught dance classes to children and adults, including diversely able individuals, psychiatric patients and court involved population from 2001 through 2006. In New York since 2006, she dances with Sokolow Theater Dance Ensemble, Dances for Isadora and independent choreographers while studying Humphrey-Limon and contemporary techniques. She started training with Vangeline of Vangeline Theater in 2008 and through her with other prominent Butoh Masters, such as Katsura Kan, Diego Pinon, the Tamanos, Yumiko Yoshioka, amongst others, making Butoh an integral part of her artistic and spiritual practice. Margherita is a certified Vinyasa and Yin yoga instructor and teacher trainer, and has the privilege to share her work in yoga studios, prisons and schools.

Our classes are open level and beginners are welcome.

Our Butoh classes are by suggested donation. Feel free to donate another amount than the suggested donation.
You can pay for class either:
1) cash before each class- $20 suggested donation
2) you have the option of buying one class via Paypal
3) or buy a class with your debit or credit card via our secure shop

 

KAZUO OHNO

 

“I would love to offer you even something as tiny as a grain of sand. If only I could succeed in doing that, then I might fulfill my longing to share a part of my life with you. Isn’t it worth risking one’s life to offer something as microscopic as that tiny single grain of sand chosen from amidst countless millions? Take great care at all times. Even the most infinitesimal detail of the slightest gesture you make should be executed with loving care.
It’s never too late to start”
-Kazuo Ohno, from Kazuo Ohno’s World: From Without & Within

“My soul is turning to ashes.
If I breathe out
They spill from my body.
I breathe myself in and out.
My soul floats throughout the sky
As it turns to ashes and falls.”
-Kazuo Ohno, from Kazuo Ohno’s World: From Without & Within

“A great many people are constantly coming to life in me. Aren’t they reaching out to me in my day-to-day life as their souls permeate my body? That’s not inconceivable. Since each and everyone of us is born in and of this universe, we’re linked to every single thing in it. There’s nothing to stop us from reaching out and touching the entire universe.”
-Kazuo Ohno, from Kazuo Ohno’s World: From Without & Within

“We weren’t conscious of what we were doing as we devoured each other. On eating our fill, we both ceased to exist, leaving only love in our wake. Did I sacrifice myself as we tore into each other? He allowed me eat my fill. For my part, I ate as much I wanted. He offered me everything, and I likewise offered him all I had to give.
We can take each other’s life, just as we can allow each other to live. Knowing that we can’t extricate ourselves from the life cycle, we didn’t suffer as a result of following our instincts. We took great pleasure in being devoured. It was just as though we were frolicking about like children. We found gratification in eating our fill, by devouring each other.
And now, I live in a world where I strum this wooden floor beneath my feet. I live in a world where there are no boundaries between here and the hereafter.”
Kazuo Ohno, from Kazuo Ohno’s World: From Without & Within



This program is supported in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.